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    children rhymes

    +3  Views: 1705 Answers: 8 Posted: 6 years ago

    8 Answers

    http://deptfordvisions.com/wp-content/gallery/cache/2688__700x_20100627_m6-deptford-garage-017-1000_0.jpg

    Don't ever laugh as the hearse goes by, 

    For you may be the next to die, 

    They put you in a big black box, 

    Then cover you up with dirt and rocks, 

    All goes well for about a week, 

    Then your coffin begins to leak, 

    The worms crawl in, the worms crawl out, 

    The worms play Pinochle on your snout, 

    They eat your eyes, they eat your nose, 

    They eat the jelly between your toes, 

    Your eyes fall out, and your teeth decay, 

    A rotten end to a lovely day.



    hector5559

    I like C/B,very happy go lucky,
    bustieone

    Countless kids are still in therapy over this one, I am sure!
    ROMOS

    Jelly between your toes??
    country bumpkin

    Moderator
    Toe jelly (or jam) is a slang reference to the dead skin cells, sock fluff, surface dirt, sweat, skin oils and bacteria which tend to collect between a person's toes throughout the day.
    hector5559

    Jelly on your belly.
    country bumpkin

    Moderator
    Dennis, Stop looking at my Belly? LOL
    Ducky

    Moderator
    You guys are making me sick! :((
    mycatsmom

    C B --that's going to scare kids !! :-{}
    country bumpkin

    Moderator
    Yep, when I was a kid my aunt would recite this to me every time we drove past the funeral home or saw a hearse. Tee hee hee, I used to hold my breath when we passed by the funeral home so I would not inhale dead people germs and die! (*~*)
    Ducky

    Moderator
    CB...Don't try to fool us, you probably still do that. LOL!!
    Ducky

    Moderator
    Okay...I won't tell. :)))
    country bumpkin

    Moderator
    Hahaha! As soon as I began reading this comment I thought to myself, " Self, this comment from DonBoyed is going to end up being an advertisement". The way the comment was written reminded me of the person who commented to me on another thread about the nappies which also turned out to be an advertisement. Great job Mrs. Ducky.
    Ducky

    Moderator
    Thanks CB. Just one of the many names in our "group" of daily free advertisers! I hope they (s/he) find another forum soon.

    Miss Mary Mack, Mack, Mack


    All dressed in black, black, black


    With silver buttons, buttons, buttons


    All down her back, back, back


    She climbed so high, high, high


    Up to the sky, sky, sky


    She never came back, back, back


    'Til the fourth of July, July, JULY!!!

    mycatsmom

    Ducks, I taught that dance and song to many , many kids when I was the long term sub for music.
    Ducky

    Moderator
    Memories. :)

    "Twas once a man from Pawtucket, ...."   Oh no, that's not the one, never mind! 

    Ducky

    Moderator
    Was he friends with "an old lady from Leeds"?

    Tooty tooty


    Fruity in my booty

    itsmee

    This struck my funny bone. I don’t know why. : D
    sawali

    so it works,itsmee!

    Mother Goose!   Here's a few titles:

    *Little Bo-Peep  *Little Boy Blue   *Rain      *The Clock      *Winter     *Fingers and Toes
    *A Seasonable Song       *Dame Trot and Her Cat     *Three Children on the Ice
    *Cross Patch      *The Old Woman Under a Hill    *Tweedle-Dum and Tweedle-Dee
    *Oh Dear!     *Old Mother Goose      *Little Jumping Joan     *Pat-a-Cake
    *Money and the Mare     *Robin Redbreast     *A Melancholy Song     *Jack
    *Going to St. Ives     *Thirty Days Hath September     *Baby Dolly     *Bees
    *Come Out to Play      *If Wishes Were Horses      *To Market     *Old Chairs to Mend
    *Robin and Richard     *A Man and a Maid      *Here Goes My Lord     *The Clever Hen
    *Two Birds     *Leg Over Leg     *Lucy Locket     *When Jenny Wren Was Young
    *Barber     *The Flying Pig     *Solomon Grundy      *Hush-a-Bye      *Burnie Bee
    *Three Wise Men of Gotham     *The Hunter of Reigate     *Little Polly Flinders
    *Ride Away, Ride Away     *Pippen Hill     *Pussy-Cat and Queen     *The Winds
    *Clap Handies     *Christmas      *Elizabeth     *Just Like Me     *Play Days    
    *Heigh-Ho, the Carrion Crow     *A B C     *A Needle and Thread     *Banbury Cross
     
    (I had so many from just one page, it was ridiculous. This isn't 1/4 of them)


    Either use the internet  www.fidella.com/trmg/title.html‎  will get you a couple pages of MG rhymes, or get to a bookstore and but a book.  

    Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall.  Humpty Dumpty had a great fall.
    All the king's horses, and all the king's men couldn't put Humpty together again.      ""

    mycatsmom

    Humpty Dumpty was a satire against the English monarchy losing one of their wars.( or was it the German? ) ......as most old nursery rhymes were.
    Bob/PKB

    mcm: I did some WIKIPEDIA research about Humpty Dumpty, and this is what I found. Goes along with what you said, and then some:
    According to the Oxford English Dictionary the term "humpty dumpty" referred to a drink of brandy boiled with ale in the seventeenth century.[1] The riddle probably exploited (another theory was that H.D. was a riddle), for misdirection, the fact that "humpty dumpty" was also eighteenth-century reduplicative slang for a short and clumsy person.[8] The riddle may depend on the assumption that, whereas a clumsy person falling off a wall might not be irreparably damaged, an egg would be. The rhyme is no longer posed as a riddle, since the answer is now so well known. Similar riddles have been recorded by folklorists in other languages, such as "Boule Boule" in French, "Lille Trille" in Swedish and Norwegian and "Runtzelken-Puntzelken" or "Humpelken-Pumpelken" in different parts of Germany; although none is as widely known as Humpty Dumpty is in English.[1]

    The rhyme does not explicitly state that the subject is an egg, possibly because it may have been originally posed as a riddle.[1] There are also various theories of an original "Humpty Dumpty". One, advanced by Katherine Elwes Thomas in 1930[9] and adopted by Robert Ripley,[1] posits that Humpty Dumpty is King Richard III of England, depicted in Tudor histories, and particularly in Shakespeare's play, as humpbacked and who was defeated, despite his armies at Bosworth Field in 1485. However, the term humpback was not recorded until the eighteenth century, and no direct evidence linking the rhyme with the historical figure has been advanced.[10]

    At circle time this went over big with the kids ...


    How do you do?


    How do you do Andy Gump?


    How is Hector?


    How is Min?


    How’s the whisker on your chin?  (Thanks to my Gramma)


     

    Little Bo Peep, She lost her sheep , and she didn't know what to do .So, she sat on a tuffet, and was eating her curds and way. When , along came a spider, and sat down beside her and said it was Charlotte's Web.

    itsmee

    Funny ... I’ll try that one on my little girls.

    Lots to choose from here >>>http://www.songsforteaching.com/nurseryrhymes.htm



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