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    What Is @ Called ?

    0  Views: 401 Answers: 4 Posted: 6 years ago

    4 Answers

    it is the symbol for 'at'

    I'm with you, there is bound to be a name for it. I'll check and see.....I found this:


    At sign


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    "@" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Enclosed A: ?.


    @


    At sign


    Punctuation
    apostrophe ( ’ ' )
    brackets ( [ ], ( ), { }, ? ? )
    colon ( : )
    comma ( , ? ? )
    dash ( ?, –, —, ? )
    ellipsis ( …, ..., . . . )
    exclamation mark ( ! )
    full stop/period ( . )
    guillemets ( « » )
    hyphen ( ? )
    hyphen-minus ( - )
    question mark ( ? )
    quotation marks ( ‘ ’, “ ”, ' ', " " )
    semicolon ( ; )
    slash/stroke/solidus ( /, ⁄ )
    Word dividers
    interpunct ( · )
    space ( ) ( ) ( )
    General typography
    ampersand ( & )
    asterisk ( * )
    at sign ( @ )
    backslash ( \ )
    bullet ( • )
    caret ( ^ )
    dagger ( †, ‡ )
    degree ( ° )
    ditto mark ( ? )
    inverted exclamation mark ( ¡ )
    inverted question mark ( ¿ )
    number sign/pound/hash ( # )
    numero sign ( № )
    obelus ( ÷ )
    ordinal indicator ( º, ª )
    percent, per mil ( %, ‰ )
    basis point ( ? )
    pilcrow ( ¶ )
    prime ( ′, ″, ? )
    section sign ( § )
    tilde ( ~ )
    underscore/understrike ( _ )
    vertical bar/broken bar/pipe ( ¦, | )
    Intellectual property
    copyright symbol ( © )
    registered trademark ( ® )
    service mark ( ? )
    sound recording copyright ( ? )
    trademark ( ™ )
    Currency
    currency (generic) ( ¤ )
    currency (specific)
    ( ? ? ? ¢ ? ? ? $ ? ? ? € ƒ ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? £ ? ? ? ? ? ? ¥ ? )
    Uncommon typography
    asterism ( ? )
    index/fist ( ? )
    interrobang ( ? )
    irony punctuation ( ? )
    lozenge ( ◊ )
    reference mark ( ? )
    tee ( ? )
    up tack ( ⊥ )
    therefore sign ( ∴ )
    because sign ( ? )
    tie ( ? )
    Related
    diacritical marks
    whitespace characters
    non-English quotation style ( « », „ ” )
    In other scripts
    Chinese punctuation
    Hebrew punctuation
    Japanese punctuation
    Korean punctuation


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    The at sign or @ is also commonly called the at symbol or commercial at in English—and less commonly a wide range of other terms.[1][2][3][4] The fact that there is no single word in English for the symbol has prompted some writers to use the French arobase[5] or Spanish arroba—or to coin new words such as apserand[3], ampersat[6]—but none of these has achieved wide currency.


    Originally an accounting and commercial invoice abbreviation meaning "at the rate of" (e.g. 7 widgets @ $2 = $14), it was not included on the keyboard of the earliest commercially successful typewriters, but was on at least one 1889 model[7] and the very successful Underwood models from the "Underwood No. 5" in 1900 onward. It is now universally included on computer keyboards.


    In recent years, its meaning has grown to include the sense of being "located at" or "directed at", especially in email addresses and social media like Facebook and Twitter.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At_sign

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-1773,00.html



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